Directors

Tom Ginsburg
John Hagan
Terence Halliday
Charlotte Ku

 

 

Tom Ginsburg

Co-director, Center on Law and Globalization
Professor of Law
University of Chicago College of Law

A scholar in comparative public law and regulation, international law and arbitration, law and economics, and the politics of legal reform in developing countries.

 Prior to that, he served a clerkship with the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal at The Hague, Netherlands, and was on the law faculty of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. Ginsburg previously staffed the Mekong Region Law Center in Bangkok, an international non-governmental organization for legal training and exchange in Southeast Asia. Ginsburg also served The Asia Foundation in a variety of roles, focusing on issues related to the role of law in economic development and democratization.  He has recently served as a visiting professor at the University of Trento, Italy, and a consultant to the Judicial Commission of Afghanistan.

 Professor Ginsburg’s scholarship has been published in journals such as Law and Social Inquiry, Theoretical Inquiries in Law, and Constitutional Political Economy. His article, “Dismantling the Developmental State?,” was published in 49 American Journal of Comparative Law 585 (2001) and won the Hessel Yntema Prize from the American Society for Comparative Law for the best paper by an author under 40.   His recent book, Judicial Review in New Democracies, was published by Cambridge University Press.  He has taught and presented work at numerous universities in Asia, Europe, and North America.

 Ginsburg received his degrees from the University of California at Berkley: a J.D. with honors from Boalt Hall School of Law, a Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy, and a bachelor’s degree in Asian Studies.

Contact Information:
phone: 773-834-3087
email: tginsburg@uchicago.edu

John Hagan

Co-Director, Center on Law and Globalization
John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law, Northwestern University
Research Professor, American Bar Foundation

John Hagan is John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law at Northwestern University and Research Professor at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago. He previously held positions as University Professor and Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of Toronto, Dahlstrom Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. In addition, he served as President of the American Society of Criminology, and has worked as editor for various journals including Annual Review of Law and Social Science. Hagan is highly a highly regarded researcher, and his scholarship has been widely published. His research spans topics from causes of crime to war crimes and human rights.

Hagan developed an early interest in the social organization of subjective justice that is reflected in his American Sociological Review article with Carla Shedd and Monique Payne on “Race, Ethnicity and Youth Perceptions of Criminal Injustice.”

His articles and book, Structural Criminology, present a power-control theory of crime and delinquency. This theory emphasizes the roles of patriarchical families and states in shaping patterns of criminality. The application of this theory is broadened in a 2005 Criminology article with Wenona Rymond-Richmond and Patricia Parker on the patrimonial patterning of genocide in Darfur. Power-control theory also plays a role in his research on lawyers and the legal profession, including his book with Fiona Kay on Gender in Practice and in work with Holly Foster in their 2001 American Sociological Review paper on “The End of Adolescence.”

Hagan’s Presidential Address to the American Society of Criminology underlined the role of poverty in crime. This theme is central to his research with Bill McCarthy on homeless youth for their book, Mean Streets, and he recently published “The Mean Streets of the Global Village: Crimes of Exclusion in the United States and Darfur” with Wenona Rymond-Richmond in the Scandinavian Journal of Criminology and Crime Prevention.

As a Guggenheim Fellow, Hagan studied the migration of American Vietnam war resisters to Canada that is described in the book Northern Passage.

Hagan’s recent work has focused on the international tribunal where Slobodan Milosevic was tried. His book, Justice in the Balkans, is a social history of The Hague Tribunal, and this project is further developed in 2006 Law & Society Review and Law & Social Inquiry articles with Sanja Kutnjak Ivokovic, Ron Levi and Gabrielle Ferrales. Hagan’s research continues to fuse crime and justice issues, examining the projection of human rights advocacy in an era characterized by the increasing perpetration of war crimes.

His current work on Darfur argues that criminology has too long neglected crimes against humanity and genocide, “the crime of crimes.” He is the co-authored with Alberto Palloni of “Death in Darfur,” which appeared in Science, and is co-author with Wenona Rymond-Richmond of the forthcoming book, Darfur and the Crime of Genocide (Cambridge University Press 2008).

Contact Information:
Phone: (847) 491-5688

ABF: (312) 988-6595
Email: jhagan@abfn.org

Terence Halliday

Co-Director, Center on Law and Globalization
Research Professor, American Bar Foundation
Adjunct Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University.

A native New Zealander, Dr. Halliday received undergraduate and graduate degrees from Massey University, New Zealand, and the University of Toronto. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

A specialist in law-making and institution-building, Dr. Halliday directs two research programs on law and globalization.

With Professor Bruce Carruthers, Department of Sociology Northwestern University, Halliday has recently completed a book, Law’s Global Markets, on global norm-making and national law-making on corporate bankruptcy. Funded by the American Bar Foundation and National Science Foundation, the book and related articles draw on three sets of empirical evidence: (1) a cross-national, time-series analysis of bankruptcy reforms, worldwide, from 1978 to 1998; (2) extensive interviewing and participant observation of international institutions involved in the creation of global norms for corporate bankruptcy; and (3) case studies of bankruptcy law-making in China, Indonesia and Korea since the Asian Financial Crisis.

He is engaged in a parallel study with Professor Susan Block-Lieb, Law, Fordham University, of the United Nations Commission on International Trade law (UNCITRAL). Their book on UNCITRAL’s law-making, with special reference to the production of the Legislative Guide on Insolvency, will be completed in 2008.

Halliday is Co-Principal Investigator with Professor Lucien Karpik (Ecoles des Mines and EHESS, Paris) and Professor Malcolm Feeley (University of California, Berkeley) on a National Science Foundation funded project for an international research collaboration of scholars to study the mobilization of legal occupations (the “legal complex”) in the rise and fall of political liberalism, including basic legal freedoms. He edited (with Lucien Karpik) the first volume in this series on the comparative politics of lawyers in the development of moderate states, civil society, and citizenship (Lawyers and the Rise of Western Political Liberalism, Oxford, 1998). Their new volume, Fighting for Political Freedom (Oxford, Hart Publishing) will be published in the fall, 2007. It includes fifteen national case studies from four continents with a theoretical Introduction and Postscript. Two new projects are underway: one on the legal complex and struggles for political freedom in post-colonial societies that became independent after World War II; and another on contemporaneous retreats from political liberalism in societies where it has long been established. Both are funded by the National Science Foundation.

Halliday has taught at the University of Toronto, the Australian National University, the University of Chicago and has been a Visitor, Center for Sociolegal Studies, Wolfson College, Oxford University, and the Australian National University. He has served as a consultant to the State Council Office on Restructuring the Economic System; China; the World Bank; OECD; and various non-profit foundations in the U.S.

Halliday has served as Editor, Law and Social Inquiry; General Editor, Onati International Series in Law and Society; and Co-Editor, Current Legal Sociology. He has served as President, Section on Sociology of Law, American Sociological Association; President, Working Group on Comparative Studies of Legal Professions, and a Board Member, Research Committee on the Sociology of Law, International Sociological Association. He was a founding Board member of the International Institute in the Sociology of Law, Onati, Spain. He currently is a Trustee and member of the Executive Committee, Law and Society Association (USA) and the Chair of its International Affairs Committee.

Recent publications on law and globalization : Terence C. Halliday, Lucien Karpik & Malcolm M. Feeley (Eds). 2007. Fighting for Political Freedom: Comparative Studies of the Legal Complex and Political Change. Oxford: Hart Publishing (Oñati International Series in Law and Society).

Terence C. Halliday, Lucien Karpik & Malcolm M. Feeley. 2007. “Struggles for Political Liberalism: Reaching for a Theory of the Legal Complex and Political Mobilisation.” In Fighting for Political Freedom: Comparative Studies of the Legal Complex and Political Change, edited by Terence C. Halliday, Lucien Karpik, and Malcolm M. Feeley. Oxford: Hart Publishing.

Contact Information:
Center Office, American Bar Foundation
(1) 847-988-6593
Email: halliday@abfn.org